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Printer Friendly VersionSelected Information - Completed Research

CP223  Disposal of Mains Flushing Waste Water Distribution
Following substantial water quality driven rehabilitation, water suppliers are increasing pro-active flushing, often within Distribution Operational Management Systems (DOMS), to minimise water quality incidents and events. Flushing removes deposits, infestations, contaminated water and rinse waters after reinstatement. New technologies are also being applied to clean floors of reservoirs whilst still in service. These activities generate wastewaters that need to be disposed of with minimal environmental impact and cost, in a manner acceptable to Regulators.

Current guidelines are generally based on best practice identified in the 1980's. Since then the regulatory framework has changed with establishment of the Environment Agency (EA) and Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). Network maintenance is now commonly outsourced to contractors who may not have formal guidelines for disposal. New technologies have been developed such as microfiltration, hydrocyclones and high rate clarification that can mitigate environmental impacts.

This project will provide updated guidelines for the disposal of waste waters incorporating legislation / requirements of regulatory bodies and the application of new treatment technologies.

Benefits to Clients

  • Better understanding of environmental impacts of waste disposal, and how these can be minimised, whilst undertaking distribution maintenance.
  • Reduced risk of non-compliance with waste disposal regulations.
  • Increased awareness of the applicability and capability of treatment technologies
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